Postdoctoral Positions

Peter Burgers

Post-doctoral positions are available to study DNA-protein interactions in eukaryotic DNA replication and DNA damage response mechanisms. Our studies integrate biochemical with genetic analysis using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. Applicants should possess a strong background in biochemistry, and have experience in protein purification and analysis. Experience in genetic analysis is preferred. Please, see the lab’s home page for more information.

Interested candidates should send their c.v. and three letters of reference to:

Dr. Peter Burgers
Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Washington University School of Medicine
660 S. Euclid Ave., Campus Box 8231
St. Louis, MO 63110
E-mail: burgers@wustl.edu


Carl Frieden

ApoE4, a protein of 299 amino acids, is the major risk factor for the development of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease while apoE3, which differs by a single amino acid, is not. A post-doctoral position is immediately available to study the properties of apoE isoforms by sophisticated biophysical techniques to discern why apoE3 is functionally different from apoE4. Of particular interest is the interaction of apoE with small molecules including amyloid-beta and compounds that affect the behavior of apoE. Applicants should possess a strong background in biochemistry, with experience in protein purification and functional characterization of proteins.

Interested candidates should send their c.v. and three letters of reference to:

Dr. Carl Frieden
Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Box 8231
Washington University School of Medicine
660 S. Euclid Ave
St. Louis, MO 63110
Email: friedenc@wustl.edu
Phone: 314-362-3344


Michael J. Greenberg

The Greenberg Lab at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is seeking a postdoctoral fellow to study the mechanism of disease-causing mutations associated with familial cardiomyopathies, the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people. The lab utilizes an array of cutting-edge techniques including single molecule optical trapping, protein expression and purification, stopped-flow rapid kinetics, genome editing, stem cell technologies, mathematical modeling, and tissue engineering to better understand how these point mutations lead to the disease phenotype across multiple scales of organization. Interested candidates should have a background in biophysics, protein biochemistry, cell biology, biomedical engineering, or a closely related field. Experience with single molecule biophysics is preferred. Excellent verbal and written communication skills are required. This is an excellent opportunity for trainees interested in both academic and non-academic positions to get involved in basic biophysical research with direct medical relevance.

For additional information, please see the Greenberg Lab website at glab.biochem.wustl.edu.

Interested candidates should send a cover letter, C.V., a brief research statement (i.e., 1 page describing their past research accomplishments and goals for their postdoctoral training), and the contact information for three references to Michael Greenberg at greenberg@wustl.edu.


James W. Janetka

Synthetic Medicinal Chemist

One postdoc position (or senior BS/MS with pharma experience) is now available in my lab at Washington University School of Medicine doing synthetic medicinal chemistry and structure-based drug discovery. Several projects are focused on new small molecule and peptidomimetic therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic cancer and the other area of research is targeting bacterial-host interactions (lectin/carbohydrate interactions) with small molecules to treat and prevent infectious disease. If you are interested or would like more details about the position contact me (janetkaj@wustl.edu) or send me your CV and a description of your career goals.

James W. Janetka, PhD.
Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Adjunct Professor of Chemistry
Washington University School of Medicine
660 S. Euclid Ave., Campus Box 8231
St. Louis, MO 63110
Email: janetkaj@wustl.edu
Phone: 314-362-0509


Timothy M. Lohman

Postdoctoral positions are available for studies of DNA motor proteins (helicases) involved in DNA repair and SSB protein-DNA interactions using biochemical, biophysical, single molecule fluorescence and mutational approaches. Particular emphasis is on mechanistic studies using transient kinetic methods (fluorescence, stopped-flow, quenched-flow) as well as thermodynamic (equilibrium binding and isothermal titration calorimetry, analytical ultracentrifugation), single molecule fluorescence and structural (x-ray crystallography) approaches. Please see my home page.

Interested candidates should send their c.v. and three letters of reference to:

Timothy M. Lohman
Marvin A. Brennecke Professor of Biophysics
Dept. of Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics
Washington University School of Medicine
660 S. Euclid Avenue, Box 8231
St. Louis, MO 63110
Or send e-mail to: Dr. Timothy M. Lohman


Washington University School of Medicine is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.